Justices on Mexico’s highest court moved to permit adults to possess and cultivate small quantities of marijuana without penalty.

“With these actions by the Court, the United States has become an island of federal marijuana prohibition in North America,” NORML’s Deputy Director Paul Armentano said.

In 2018, the Court determined that the sections of the federal law criminalizing the private use and cultivation of cannabis by adults were unconstitutional. At that time, the majority opined, “The effects caused by marijuana do not create an absolute prohibition on its consumption.”

Justices gave Mexican lawmakers until April 30 to enact legislation regulating the use of cannabis by adults. However, House and Senate lawmakers did not agree on a plan prior to the deadline.

Late yesterday, Mexico’s Supreme Court mandated that the Health Department begin issuing permits to members of the public who wish to either possess or grow personal use quantities of cannabis. Activities involving commercial activities remain illegal.

Canada legalized its marijuana market in 2018. Mexican lawmakers in 2009 decriminalized the possession of small amounts of cannabis (5 grams or less) and other substances.

US Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas issued an opinion yesterday questioning the legal rationale for continuing federal marijuana prohibition in the United States.

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NORML advocates for changes in public policy so that the responsible possession and use of marijuana by adults is no longer subject to criminal penalties. NORML further advocates for a regulated commercial cannabis market so that activities involving the for-profit production and retail sale of cannabis and cannabis products are safe, transparent, consumer-friendly, and are subject to state and/or local licensure. Finally, NORML advocates for additional changes in legal and regulatory policies so that those who use marijuana responsibly no longer face either social stigma or workplace discrimination, and so that those with past criminal records for marijuana-related violations have the opportunity to have their records automatically expunged.

Find out more at norml.org and read our Fact Sheets on the most common misconceptions and myths regarding reform efforts around the country.

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